frankiethebaron:

Kim Cattrall, late 70s


yas bitch yasss

frankiethebaron:

Kim Cattrall, late 70s

yas bitch yasss

Some days I want to fuck an entire football team and other days I won’t even kiss my lover.

illbeoutback:

If you’re protesting abortion, the Supreme Court says you can get right in women’s faces and scream at them on their way into the clinic. Because freedom of speech.

But if you try and protest the murder of a black man, you get tear gas fired at you.

portraits-of-america:

     “I was adopted from Korea, so my tattoos symbolize my identity: this one represents my American-ness, and this one represents my Korean-ness. I’m actually here to attend a conference for Korean adoptees—there are organizations all over the world for Koreans who were adopted into Western white families.”     “Do you find that there is a particular common theme or feeling that runs through such conferences?”     “The common thread is that you don’t have to explain to everybody why you have an American accent, or why your parents are white, or why you have an American last name, or what is it like being adopted. We already know all of that, so we don’t have to have that conversation. We’re already past that, so it’s easier to make friends and connect with people on a more intimate, emotional level. It’s a way to have one less thing that makes us feel weird. Because we’re constantly trying to not feel weird.     “People often ask me where I’m from, and I say Seattle. Then they ask me, ‘No, where is your family from?’ and I say, ‘My mom is from Ohio and my dad is from North Dakota.’ Then they say, ‘No, but where are they from originally?’ Or when people find out that I was adopted they say, ‘Oh, but then you’re not like a real Asian.’ That’s something that a lot of Asian people have to deal with. But, I’ve also heard ‘You’re very pretty for an Asian girl.’”

portraits-of-america:

     “I was adopted from Korea, so my tattoos symbolize my identity: this one represents my American-ness, and this one represents my Korean-ness. I’m actually here to attend a conference for Korean adoptees—there are organizations all over the world for Koreans who were adopted into Western white families.”
     “Do you find that there is a particular common theme or feeling that runs through such conferences?”
     “The common thread is that you don’t have to explain to everybody why you have an American accent, or why your parents are white, or why you have an American last name, or what is it like being adopted. We already know all of that, so we don’t have to have that conversation. We’re already past that, so it’s easier to make friends and connect with people on a more intimate, emotional level. It’s a way to have one less thing that makes us feel weird. Because we’re constantly trying to not feel weird.
     “People often ask me where I’m from, and I say Seattle. Then they ask me, ‘No, where is your family from?’ and I say, ‘My mom is from Ohio and my dad is from North Dakota.’ Then they say, ‘No, but where are they from originally?’ Or when people find out that I was adopted they say, ‘Oh, but then you’re not like a real Asian.’ That’s something that a lot of Asian people have to deal with. But, I’ve also heard ‘You’re very pretty for an Asian girl.’”

This speaks to me because I have a troll collection

This speaks to me because I have a troll collection

(Source: happiestdisneyblogonearth)

portraits-of-america:

     “I’ve been traveling on and off and living outside for about six years now.”     “What’s one thing you’ve learned from living this way?”     “I’ve learned how to create my own lifestyle and not rely on money. In this society, we’re told that you’re nothing if you don’t have money. Not everyone feels that way, but I think I get ignored when people walk by because they fall into that mentality. If I’m on the street with no money, it means I’m not worth talking to. I’ve also had people say some not-so-nice things to me. In my experience, people who don’t have as much—or even if they have a lot, but understand that physical things aren’t truly important in their lives—are able to connect better with people.”











I bet my left tit this girl has family money to fall back on.~sips sweet tea with extra ice~

portraits-of-america:

     “I’ve been traveling on and off and living outside for about six years now.”
     “What’s one thing you’ve learned from living this way?”
     “I’ve learned how to create my own lifestyle and not rely on money. In this society, we’re told that you’re nothing if you don’t have money. Not everyone feels that way, but I think I get ignored when people walk by because they fall into that mentality. If I’m on the street with no money, it means I’m not worth talking to. I’ve also had people say some not-so-nice things to me. In my experience, people who don’t have as much—or even if they have a lot, but understand that physical things aren’t truly important in their lives—are able to connect better with people.”

I bet my left tit this girl has family money to fall back on.

~sips sweet tea with extra ice~

Matt is Felisha

I need a responsible adult to hold my hand and help me with going back to school.

I wish people would leave asks in my inbox.

I wish I was more popular on here/had more of an internet presence.

That makes me sound so shallow.

magic-spelldust:

(via Untitled | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

(Source: sharpasaprick)

After having meat sweats yesterday, I need to eat a nice salad today.

devoutfashion:

American Beauty: Model Akuol de Mabior for Summary Magazine

laurapalmerwalkswithme:

Sheryl Lee and Dana Ashbrook at “Women we love” Gala, 1992

laurapalmerwalkswithme:

Sheryl Lee and Dana Ashbrook at “Women we love” Gala, 1992